Direct Sales Recruiting: 7 Tips For Turning a Cold Prospect Into a Hot One

Create a positive mental attitude before you get on the phone or meet with your prospect in person. Always be prepared and professional but warm and engaging. Selling is just one aspect of direct selling.

Recruiting and building a large team of direct sellers is the way to earn a residual income in direct sales. Effective recruiting requires understanding human psychology. You’re a matchmaker – matching your prospect with your opportunity.

Start by asking questions and forming a connection first. Find out what your prospect is looking for. What is the gap where she is now and where she wants to be?

There are many reasons why your prospect wants to start a business. From earning more money, to staying home to raise her children, or having a more flexible schedule… you won’t know unless you ask and listen carefully.

Share stories instead of selling. Tell your prospect how the extra money you’re earning have made a difference in your life. Maybe it has allowed you to quit your job, have more time with your family, or more money to splurge on dinners and vacations.

By sharing your success story, it’s a powerful way to connect with your prospect and appeal to her emotions. Your story will inspire her to move from where she’s at to where she wants to be. You want your prospect to think if she can do it, so can I. Your goal is to help her make a decision that is right for her.

Don’t talk about your products or company right away. Recruiting is about forming a connection and building the like and trust factor. Have your company brochures available and send her home with those. In this internet era, chances are your prospect would have already looked at your company info online before meeting with you in person.

At the end of the recruiting process, whatever your prospect’s decision is, always be gracious and never make your prospect feel bad about not joining your business. Ask to stay in touch by email and who knows, maybe she will be interested in the future. But make a bad impression and you’ll never get another chance.

Remember: selling and recruiting is never about you. It’s always about your prospect. Your prospect is making a decision that’s best for her and not for you.

Do your best to leave your ego out of the conversation which will help you to stay calm during the process. This will actually put you in a better light instead of being defensive and making a case if there’s an objection to the business opportunity.

Selling directly never works because no one likes to be sold to. When it comes to recruiting, provide enough information to help your prospect make a decision.

To get more recruiting tips and start attracting the right prospects to your business – be sure to get my FREE tips.

Create a Successful Email Marketing Campaign

Like any campaign or marketing effort, there are certain ways you can maximize your ROI. Follow these tips to ensure your email marketing campaign is engaging your audience and providing successful marketing results.

PART I: DESIGN

The design of your email campaign affects your consumer perception as well as the potential engagement from recipients. Some key areas to focus on are:

Theme: The overall look & feel should match your brand image. Any fonts, PMS colors, or graphic elements used in your logo or other marketing pieces should be carried over into your email design.

Style: Use images and ample white space to break up copy and make the message easy on the eye. Images should support content by providing a visual representation of your message. If you’re using a colored background, be sure the contrast between the background color & the copy is dramatic enough to provide clear legibility.

Format: The layout of your email can impact the comprehension of the over all message. The format should be clean, simple, and easy understand.

* Header: You may be inclined to place your logo or an event logo at the top of your email, however, some email clients auto disable images or the reader may be viewing your message on a smart phone that does not enable images. If you’re logo or event title is an image file, it will be lost on these readers. To avoid this problem, write your message title and business name in text at the top.

* Body: Using a side bar menu or too many additional links will clutter your message and confuse your reader about the call to action. Keep the body of your message clean and clear. If you’re creating a newsletter, define different articles or events with graphic dividers and bold title fonts.

* Footer: This is a good place for your logo image as well as contact, subscriber info, and disclaimer.

PART II: CONTENT

The most important goal of your campaign content is to create a message your target audience wants to read about. Your message should be worth saving and or sharing with others. Follow these steps in order to create clear & valuable content.

Determine the Objective: In general there are 3 types of objectives with email marketing-

* Promote: motivate purchases or increase event attendance

* Inform: increase awareness among potential or current customers or for differentiating your brand among competitors

* Relate: build relationships, loyalty, & referrals

Determine the Form: Again, there are 3 types of forms used in email marketing and each has it’s own frequency, content focus, and call to action.

* Newsletters: Regular intervals (weekly/monthly), education info provided in bullets or summary, soft CTA (learn/read more).

* Promotions/Invites/Surveys: Frequency follows sales cycle, limited & direct content, hard CTA (call/sign up now)

* Announcements: Event driven, news, holiday, or thank you oriented, soft CTA.

Valuable Content: The key to a successful campaign ultimately lies in how worthwhile the content is to the audience. Be sure the immediate benefit is clearly defined for your reader. Some ideas for valuable content include:

* Knowledge: Sharing your expertise, use facts & testimonials, give guidance & direction

* Advantage: Discounts & coupons, exclusivity or VIP status, contests & giveaways

* Attention: Acknowledge and response to audience

Keep it Concise: This goes along with ease on the eye- Presenting too much information at once will overwhelm your reader. To prevent burn out and ensure the reader can easily access the information s/he is interested in, follow these guidelines:

* Host large bodies of content elsewhere- link to website or blog, PDF attachment

* Limit to essential info- use bullets, summaries, or links to more info elsewhere

Structure: Getting people just to open, let alone read your emails can be strongly impacted by the external appearance of your message. Key areas to focus on are:

*

* From line: Use a name your audience will recognize. For more targeted lists, this could be a personal name. For broad lists use the brand for both the name & email address, i.e. “[email protected]”.

Subject line: Keep it short and simple, limit to 30-40 characters (including spaces) or 5-8 words. Identify the immediate value/benefit of reading the content. Avoid “spammy” grammar such as all caps and multiple punctuation marks.

Permissions: Always be sure to ask people before you send them your campaign. This can be done with a sign-up sheet on location or an opt-in on your website. You can also verbally confirm permission. Be as specific as possible about the content your reader can expect to receive. It’s generally helpful to provide a preview or past email. Also provide an unsubscribe option; this will prevent you from unnecessary aggravation should a reader no longer wish to receive your emails, as well as show your respect for privacy.

PART III: ANALYTICS/TOOLS

Whether your using your own service provider or a marketing agency to develop your campaigns, reviewing the analytics is an important part of measuring success as well as using the information to grow and improve future campaigns. These are some areas to check regularly to optimize your campaign.

Bounce Rates: A bounce rate is the immediate return of your email. There are two types of bounces which can occur. The first is a hard bounce which indicates a permanent error with the email address, i.e. a spelling error or deleted address. If the address no longer exists, the contact is most likely no longer there. This provides an opportunity for you to create a new contact with that company as well as find the old contact and acquire business with his/her new company. Alternatively, a soft bounce is a temporary server issue, i.e. recipients inbox is full or the message was identified as spam & blocked. Generally if the email is re-sent at a later time the message will get through.

Open Rates: Open rates track the interaction with your email, not the delivery. It’s tracked by two codes hidden in your email. One is placed in the body, the other is in the embedded image you might have (i.e. logo). A key note here is if images are not enabled by the user- whether the function has been turned off by the email provider or the reader is viewing the email on a text only phone- the email will be marked as unopened.

Click-Through Rates: Click through rates identify how many people have clicked a link provided in your email and arrived at the designated page. You can use this information to determine which article or topics are of the greatest interest and which you may want to eliminate in the future. You can also create a list of contacts interested in a particular topic, so that you can direct future emails on that subject toward them in the future.

Function Scan: This is a great preventative tool to use before you send out your campaign. It scans your message to test for link and image functionality, as well as evaluate your subject & content for “spam-like” properties, so you can prevent errors which may deteriorate your message.

Direct-Mail Copywriting – Finding the Gold

When it comes to direct mail copywriting, finding quality marketing examples is like finding a needle inside the proverbial haystack.

Here, check this out: I’m a perpetual student. I have piles of books and papers all over the house. Courses, magazines, books, letters, and hundreds of pages of material I’ve printed from things I stumble across online.

And they’re everywhere.

Some small piles towards the back of the dinner table where no one really sits… another medium-sized stash on the chair in the dining room where no one notices too much… on top of every desk in my office… on the floor in the bathrooms next to the toilet (But not in my teenaged sons bathrooms – even I won’t venture into that place.)… and scattered around my desk on the floor in my office, I have several piles as well.

Occasionally I get through one or two of the piles, or if I take a long plane flight I’ll scoop them up and stuff ‘em in my briefcase and they’ll tend to disappear for a while, but then… within a few weeks, they magically reappear like some sort of weed in your garden you could swear you just pulled out last week, and the last week before that.

The thing is, while most of the stuff in these piles contains good information, most of the direct mail I receive, is pure crap. No matter how hard I try and find even one good idea I could use and run with, I just keep turning up empty-handed.

The other day, however, I received a very interesting piece in the mail, which I can use and actually improve on.

It was a crumpled up piece of paper, that was a cover letter to a sales piece. The letter had scrawled across it, in handwriting, something to the effect of, “I figured since you threw out the last two pieces of mail I sent you, I’d give you a head start on this one.”

This was pretty clever as a lift letter for a follow-up piece, I thought.

The copy itself wasn’t very compelling, but the concept worked. The piece was supposed to get me to stop and pay attention and I did.

Unfortunately, the actual selling piece was awful. They could have sent me the Hope Diamond as a free gift, and I still wouldn’t have been able to read through it. But the point is, at least I found an idea to run with.

The truth is, looking for exact models, in anything, is rarely productive. But searching for good ideas, finding them and then adapting them to your specific needs, is incredibly productive.

There are a few changes I would have made, to the lift note, and if you use direct mail, pay close attention to them: I would have used yellow paper, and I probably would have written the note in blue ink instead of black. I also would have included my picture on this lift note as well. Photos always get more attention and boost your response rates.

Since the transaction value was high, which means the vendor could afford to spend money to acquire customers, I also would have sent the entire thing in a garbage can mailer, instead of just crumpling the note up.

The garbage cans I’m talking about are small garbage cans you can mail out – several of my clients have used them successfully. I’m sure you’ll agree, it is virtually impossible to ignore something like this when you receive it in your mailbox.

The big problem with all this, is you typically can’t find good ideas like this in even 1 out of every 100 pieces of mail you might get. But that’s O.K., because… when it comes to direct-mail copywriting, even one good idea… is worth it’s weight… in gold.