Sample Social Media Marketing Plan

Need a sample social media marketing plan? This is a quick and dirty sample plan without any BS. This plan will assume that you already have accounts with Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, and YouTube. This sample social media marketing plan also assumes that you have already made your accounts personalized and interesting so we can focus right in on the activities you need to execute.

1. Twitter Make it a daily habit to follow 90 to 110 new people every single day. You can do this manually or use a program like Twitter Friend Adder to accomplish this. Make sure you filter out other marketers and only follow real people who have an interest in the niche that you are marketing. How do you quickly and easily find these people? Use the search bar at the Twitter home page, type in your topic, and then type “-http” and “-www” to only find Tweets that are not promoting an external link. These people are laser targeted.

Start using a service to automate your Tweets like SocialOomph. Twitter no longer allows duplicate Tweets but you can use the recurring Tweet feature to schedule recurring Tweets with spin-able text so that each recurring Tweet is different. You will need to go in daily or every other day to make a slight change to each Tweet in the spinning text but you can make a change as subtle as including that days date. You just have to do something minor to make each Tweet unique so it won’t be rejected by Twitter. You would probably want to put in about 24 different Tweets that include your marketing message and set up the recurring Tweet for once every hour. Make sure you always answer the question, “What are you doing?” For example, if you are selling an e-book about how to be a better bass fishermen, don’t send out a Tweet like, “attention all bass fishermen, go to this link to improve your fishing results”. Instead, send a Tweet like, “I’m reading this book to learn new bass fishing tricks to embarrass my buddy when we go fishing next week.”

2. Facebook. You should basically be doing the same thing with Facebook except that you probably wouldn’t want to add more than about 20 new friends per day to avoid getting your account deleted. Use the search function to find people who list your topic as and interest and who are part of a Facebook group centered around the topic. Broadcast your marketing message through status updates, similar to how you would using Twitter. Search for some applications within Facebook to link your Twitter account to your Facebook account so that all those automated marketing Tweets come through as status updates on Facebook. Stay away from using direct messages to Facebook friends for marketing. Make your direct messages as personal and “non-salesy” as you possible can to establish a relationship and let the status updates do the selling.

3. YouTube. Use a friend adder program like Tube Blaster Pro to automatically add 25 to 40 friends a day who have videos up about your topic. Whatever you do, do not try to sell to these friends through direct messages, video comments, or channel comments. Use the friend adding program to gather friends and make content-rich videos and then share these videos with your YouTube friends. Make sure these videos offer rich content and that they are 90% content and only 10% sales pitch. You can also link your Facebook and Twitter accounts to your YouTube account so these videos you make will be shared with your Facebook friends and Twitter followers as well. Create and share at least 1 video per week this way but no more than

4. MySpace. Use your MySpace page to combine all of these tactics. Write a long bio about yourself, your marketing niche, and what you’re all about. Make it interesting. Embed as many of your YouTube videos as you feel like on your MySpace page. Search within MySpace for applications that will link your Twitter account to your MySpace. Use a program called MySpace Friend Blaster Pro to add 90 to 110 new friends a day.

Busted Myth: Direct Mail Never Works

If you ask Zach Graves of Carino’s Italian Restaurant in Meridian, Idaho about direct mail, he’ll tell you that this marketing strategy CAN indeed work. Over the last few months he has used two different direct mail strategies with mixed results. What the losing mailer lacked, the profitable one had.

In fact, it wasn’t even close! The end results showed a 32% overall response rate for the winning campaign! (32% is not a typo). Keep in mind that a 1-2% response rate for a direct mail piece is often considered successful and profitable… let alone 32%!

Some may argue, that more often than not, restaurants will see better response rates than just about any other industry. I consent, this may be true. But whether you are a restaurant or not, getting nearly 1/3 of recipients to respond to a mailer is awesome by any standards.

And no, this mailer was not sent to an internal or warm list. It was mailed to an average sized COLD list, which makes it an even more remarkable success. The recipients were not expecting anything from Carino’s nor did they opt-in to receive anything from the restaurant.

Here’s why the direct mail campaign worked so well:

  1. We made sure their mailing list was extremely targeted. I’m talking about a specific radius around their restaurant and a well-defined income and age range. We even planned the mailer to hit the mailboxes at precisely the right time, based around an event that was about to happen in the recipient’s life.
  2. A personalized letter was sent out and included a real, hand-placed stamp. Just a note… the losing mailer was one of those direct mail coupon books full of competing offers and ads.
  3. The offer was personalized and very generous, but not so much that it “ate up” the profits. In the end, the mailer still has to be profitable, right?

Think about it. Would you rather get a generic postcard addressed to you or the “CURRENT RESIDENT”, or a personalized letter and envelope in the mail arriving at just the right time? Of course, the letter, which in turn makes you more likely to respond to the offer inside.

Maybe you’ve tried direct mail a time or two and found that it just wasn’t profitable. That’s okay. But don’t make up your mind quite yet. Instead, maybe follow the lead of Carino’s and make your next direct mail campaign worth doing.

Direct-Mail Copywriting – Finding the Gold

When it comes to direct mail copywriting, finding quality marketing examples is like finding a needle inside the proverbial haystack.

Here, check this out: I’m a perpetual student. I have piles of books and papers all over the house. Courses, magazines, books, letters, and hundreds of pages of material I’ve printed from things I stumble across online.

And they’re everywhere.

Some small piles towards the back of the dinner table where no one really sits… another medium-sized stash on the chair in the dining room where no one notices too much… on top of every desk in my office… on the floor in the bathrooms next to the toilet (But not in my teenaged sons bathrooms – even I won’t venture into that place.)… and scattered around my desk on the floor in my office, I have several piles as well.

Occasionally I get through one or two of the piles, or if I take a long plane flight I’ll scoop them up and stuff ‘em in my briefcase and they’ll tend to disappear for a while, but then… within a few weeks, they magically reappear like some sort of weed in your garden you could swear you just pulled out last week, and the last week before that.

The thing is, while most of the stuff in these piles contains good information, most of the direct mail I receive, is pure crap. No matter how hard I try and find even one good idea I could use and run with, I just keep turning up empty-handed.

The other day, however, I received a very interesting piece in the mail, which I can use and actually improve on.

It was a crumpled up piece of paper, that was a cover letter to a sales piece. The letter had scrawled across it, in handwriting, something to the effect of, “I figured since you threw out the last two pieces of mail I sent you, I’d give you a head start on this one.”

This was pretty clever as a lift letter for a follow-up piece, I thought.

The copy itself wasn’t very compelling, but the concept worked. The piece was supposed to get me to stop and pay attention and I did.

Unfortunately, the actual selling piece was awful. They could have sent me the Hope Diamond as a free gift, and I still wouldn’t have been able to read through it. But the point is, at least I found an idea to run with.

The truth is, looking for exact models, in anything, is rarely productive. But searching for good ideas, finding them and then adapting them to your specific needs, is incredibly productive.

There are a few changes I would have made, to the lift note, and if you use direct mail, pay close attention to them: I would have used yellow paper, and I probably would have written the note in blue ink instead of black. I also would have included my picture on this lift note as well. Photos always get more attention and boost your response rates.

Since the transaction value was high, which means the vendor could afford to spend money to acquire customers, I also would have sent the entire thing in a garbage can mailer, instead of just crumpling the note up.

The garbage cans I’m talking about are small garbage cans you can mail out – several of my clients have used them successfully. I’m sure you’ll agree, it is virtually impossible to ignore something like this when you receive it in your mailbox.

The big problem with all this, is you typically can’t find good ideas like this in even 1 out of every 100 pieces of mail you might get. But that’s O.K., because… when it comes to direct-mail copywriting, even one good idea… is worth it’s weight… in gold.